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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
founded the church in 1954 and while the religion has been a positive, transformative experience for some, it has long been shadowed by allegations that people have been emotionally and sometimes even physically abused. >> i don't think anybody would join scientology in order to be abusiv abusive. they go into scientology because they want help. but at a deeper level, you go further and further into the church, the distortions become more and more apparent. and it's at those levels that i think scientology has lost its way. >> why do you think the church is so controversial? >> it has a history of being very vindictive and litigious. and it has a history of infiltrating the government and spying on people. and so it has created an atmosphere of fear that surrounds it. >> in the 1970s, the church launched a massive espionage effort called operation snow white because the church believed the government was collecting information damaging to the church. fall ollowing an five raid, 11 scientologies, including hubbard's wife, were convicted of entering numerous agencies and stealing documents.
of extremism and supporting learning advances through religion and through political process these. we have to create a space where people who are pushing peace processes, that their voices can be heard. not only those who are backing military intervention that could lead to greater civilian chaos. >> thank you. drastically insufficient, that is how the international rescue committee this practical response to the situation in syria saying that the civil war has unleashed a staggering humanitarian crisis. hundreds of thousands have been forced to flee the violence. they are now making the refugee s' lives even harder. >> that has been the worst of winter is for people who fled the worst of wars. across a blanket of snow in the valley, you can see syrian families in the distance. they have taken refuge by a mosque. all of the roads in are blocked by snow. we can only reach them by foot. two rows of concrete blocks are now home. these do not keep winter snows out and don't keep anyone warm. the children are everywhere. their hands are freezing and their teeth are chattering. they are so cold.
a religion or a religious experience or community to sort of subscribe to. i think i missed the boat. i envy people who have a strong faith and a community of faith that they live in. and know that reading about your upbringing, that was a huge rock and solid high ground in your upbringing. i had a very moral upbringing, and spiritual in a not very specific way. the kind of songs that i write are sort of agnostic spiritual. tavis: it sounds oxymoron in, and yet you pull it off, an agnostic spiritual. >> to me, it is about whether or not you can stand a mystery, or where the can stand to have things b. unresolved. people want answers. particularly when there is a threat to it, when not knowing might kill you. it seems to me as though human consciousness evolved to look for trouble and to look for problems, to look for threats. it is the nature of human consciousness to look for trouble constantly, and we find it. tavis: when james taylor joined us the following year, he had just put out a terrific cd. he brought his guitar along this time, that had special meaning since the day he discovered
to recognize scientology as a religion and was demanding it pay $1 billion in back taxes. after a bitter legal battle, the irs relented and granted tax exempt status. >> there will be no billion-dollar tax bill which we can't pay. there will be no more discrimination. >> i think scientology has a lot to account for because it's protected as a religion under the first amendment. it's able to get away with a lot of things. >> reporter: author lawrence wright has written a new book out today called "going clear, scientology, hollywood and the prison of belief." wright says the victory over the irs allowed scientology to build capital and power, power, he says, the church has exploited. >> what they're doing is abusing their own members, shaking them down for money, wreaking vengeance on people that disagree with them, punishing its critics and physically abusing people and holding them against their will inside the highest levels of the church. >> reporter: the church will say complaints like this come from malcontents and that they have no credibility. do they seem credible to you? >> well, ther
sense is that regardless of culture, race religion try some commonality. these essential human truth compassion and hope some moral precepts are universal. just go and somebody is another variation he said in the speech that made famous in the 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston, where he said there's a red states blue states, but the united states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he has been dealing with that. the promise and frustrations of that idea ever sense. as i'm sure we'll both be experiencing the telephone calls, for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story." he said there's another volume coming? >> guest: added y2k committed to 40 years of robert caro, so assertive cat that on the down low, but i had every intention and i've done a lot of reporting that the later years, which influences the book even though they're not in it. and i don't want to do a quickie. i tried a rate for history documents coming o
religion they would have been interested in that. >> right. they are protecting al gore because they are protecting global warming. that's what i think it is. bernie i have to run. the journal news is wrong to print the names of legal gun owners. how about juan williams who defended the newspaper digest that? then a factor exclusive the former marines injustly incarcerated in mexico will tell us his story. i had a massive he. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. ♪ [ male announcer ] let's take every drop of courage, every ounce of inspiration, every bit of determination, and go where we've never gone before. ♪ introducing the radically new avalon. toyota. let's go places. but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all waited for. when we sit on the edge of our seats for four quarters. it represents players reaching a childhood dream. the biggest stage there is in spor
"going clear" the author puts scientology and its status aas a religion under a microscope. wright focuses on scientology's obsession with celebrity through its most famous defector, writer/director paul hagus. he won two oscars for "crash." he left the church after his daughters coming out as lesbian forced him to take a look at scientology, he discovered accounts on websites about children working for hours on end, this from nbc's "rock center." >> it's horrible treatment these kids had, terrible, they're made to work so often and all day long and these terrible conditions. [ bleep ] them for that. yeah, they should be taken down for that. >> reporter: in a statement the church says it diligently followed and continues to follow all child labor laws in every state or country in which it operates. the church says complaints about children being forced to perform chores for long hours are unfounded. haggis says he found himself in trouble with the church when he crossed its biggest celebrity, tom cruise, who had worked for years to recruit director steven spielberg into the church,
of religion. and so we have this enormous, tragic history that all of us confront from whatever our backgrounds are whether we're white, black, hispanic, asian, whether we're muslim, jew or christian. the notion that, in fact, in the words of a great writer who happened to win a nobel prize, william faulkner, he said the past is never dead and buried, it isn't even past. and i think that all of us are confronting constantly our history. we're confronting the history of slavery in this country. we're confronting the history and problems that arose as a consequence of colonialism. we're confronting those scars of violence and oppression and struggle and difficulty and hope not only on the larger canvas of history, but also within our own families. and for me it was not entirely obvious how, in fact, i was going to be able to integrate and pull together all those different strands in my life. so part of my challenge growing up was to figure out how do i function as someone who is black but also has white blood in me, how do i function as somebody who with is american and takes pride an
. clearly they must get something out of this religion and of this faith. what do you think they are getting out of scientology? >> let's start with millions of members which the church says that they have. according to census figures, 25,000 people in the u.s. call themselves scientologists. that's half the number of rastafarians. in the entire world there may be 30,000. this figure, millions of scientologists, is another one of those unsupported statements by the church that they're constantly putting out with no evidence about it at all. >> there's been a lot of reaction to your book, as you know. >> yes. >> the church has dismissed it. they have questioned your credibility, calling your sources liars. and both the canadian and the british versions of your book at the last minute are now not being published. the church says the reason is because it's false. and that it's defamatoriy. how do you respond? >> i know the church came here and talked to your executives. and you asked them to be on camera. where are they? did you ask david miskavich to come on and defend the allegations against
they were born, regardless of their religion or their sexual orientation. those principles will direct our course as we introduce our first ten bills today, a tradition we've had in the united states senate. that is the majority party introduces the first ten bills. as we mend our broken immigration system, strengthen our schools and rebuild our roads and infrastructure we look to those measures in the bills. we balance the right to bear arms with regard to every right of children. we will balance spending reductions with revenue from the wealthiest among us. those principles will ensure military members never struggle for employment. those principles must be our guide. not a single piece of important legislation can pass the senate or become law without the votes of both democrats and republicans. so we'll be willing to compromise and work with our colleagues across the aisle. unfortunately, a number of bipartisan bills passed the senate during the last congress that were never acted upon by the house of representatives. so this year the senate will revisit some of those legislative prior
but to invent your own religion you're own spirituality. ♪ you got to help me to take a stand ♪ >> if i say "fire and rain," what's the first thought you have? >> i remember where i was when i wrote the tune. >> where were you? >> whether it first occurred to me. i was in a basement flat in london in the west end. ♪ oh i seen fire and i seen rain ♪ >> and the song just came to me. and then -- >> just came to me? >> uh-huh. i mean you know, songs were -- that was happening frequently to me at that point. and -- >> why was that at that point this was happening to you? >> well, i had a lot of empty time. i had a lot of energy. i had a lot of yearning a lot of unsolved senses of -- i very much wanted to express myself and define myself. >> was that the most fertile period for you ever? >> yeah, yeah it was. i was really busting at the seams to express myself. ♪ i'm going to carolina in my mind ♪ >> where did that song come from? >> i was homesick. i was in london and i was -- i was just thinking about north carolina. i was so -- >> does it just flow once you got on to
and regulation of the land and naval forces. >> congress shall make no law remaining an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or of bridging the freedom of speech or of the press. >> steve: virginia congress led the effort and joins us live there washington. good morning to you, congressman. >> good morning. >> steve: it would seem to me that this -- it's only the second time in american history that you guys have done this because it would seem like as you kick off a new session of congress, it's essentially the owner's manual, how the country works. >> it absolutely is and leading up to the 2010 election, there was a lot of debate about how our government, the executive branch, legislative branch, even the courts were not abiding by the u.s. constitution. so i suggested to our leadership that we read the constitution at the beginning of that congress. then i asked my staff to research when is the last time it was done. turns out 1800 and never and that was a stunner for me, too. so we put it in the rules and now at the beginning of each congress we're going to read
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)